Category Archives: General

iaedp Institute Offers On Demand Video Training

iaedp Institute Training On Demand:  How to Document Evidence Based Treatment to Maximize Insurance Reimbursement

Lisa Kantor Esq.

Lisa Kantor, Esq.

As a service we are streaming, on demand, Attorney Lisa’s Symposium 2011 presentation on How to Document Evidence Based Treatment to Maximize Insurance Reimbursement. This encore presentation will be followed by a live teleconference call with Lisa on Tuesday, Sept 26 at 7 pm ET/6 pm CT/5 pm MT/4 pm PT for an update and to answer your additional questions.  You may watch the 90 minute presentation anytime (at your convenience) starting September 21st.

  1. If you wish to attend the teleconference call, you must register and we ask only those who can attend “live” register for the conference call.  Attendance on the call will be limited.
  2. To view the video you must have Windows Media Player.  If the version on your computer is not up to date, you may be asked to update it or download the program but the links to do so are provided on the video page.  After watching the video, if you want to submit a question to be answered by Lisa on the live teleconference, please submit those questions to iaedpmembers@earthlink.net.
  3. Download Lisa’s handouts and materials for this course.

LINKS: 

  1. Video:  http://player.netromedia.com/?ID=5a57395a-560a-4073-9562-13acf1b7f32c&path=/IAEDPKantor in wmv.wmv
  2. Teleconference Registration:  http://myaccount.maestroconference.com/conference/register/XVQ38AL38L6GVOVQ
  3. Handouts: 
    http://www.kantorlaw.net/Areas_of_Practice/Eating_Disorders/2011_IAEDP_Materials.aspx

Course Description:

When seeking insurance benefits for eating disorder treatment, a provider’s treatment records will be the foundation for establishing medically necessity for admission and continued treatment.  Evidence-based treatment records must show plans of care, symptoms, and objective evidence that satisfy an insurance company’s criteria for admission and continued care.  The presentation will review the criteria from insurance companies for treatment of eating disorders and explain how evidence-based treatment records can be documented to best maximize the client’s available insurance benefits.

At the end of this presentation, participants should have an understanding of

  1. The criteria used by insurance companies to determine whether benefits are payable for eating disorder treatment;
  2. How insurance companies apply their criteria to determine whether benefits are payable for eating disorder treatment; and
  3. How providers can document their evidence-based treatment to satisfy the criteria of insurance companies and maximize the client’s insurance benefits.

This is an excellent opportunity for staff training!  Hook up an LCD projector, go to the streaming site, and voila! 

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International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Unveil Winner of Newly Launched Body Image Mannequin Art Competition at Annual Symposium in Phoenix

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                                                     

Media Contacts:  Blanche Williams
800-800-8126 x 83      
iaedpmedia@gmail.com

                                                                                                       

Mannequin Winner Wows at Eating Disorders Symposium!

Rebecca Tishman

Author Jenni Schaeffer and Rebecca Tishman with "Erosion"

Rebecca Tishman Wins “Imagine Me Beyond What You See” Body Image Art Competition with “Erosion” Mannequin

Phoenix, Arizona (March 5, 2011) – The International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals Foundation (iaedp) announced its first Annual finalists and winner of the “Imagine Me Beyond What You See” Body Image Mannequin Art, an awareness contest encouraging treatment centers and private facilities with art therapists, as well as students and the general public, to work with patients to design mannequins in a way that reflects their perception of beauty.

Rebecca Tishman who created the winning mannequin, entitled “Erosion” is an interdisciplinary sculpture major at the Maryland Institute College of Art, was on hand to receive her award in person.  In her entry she stated, “It was not until I started focusing on the link between my recovery from an eating disorder and my artwork that I started to flourish in both fields.” Along with receiving a financial award and her artwork will be used in all upcoming 2012 “Imagine Me Beyond What You See” promotional materials, her mannequin was auctioned off with proceeds to benefit the iaedp Foundation. 

The first runner up was the residents and art therapist Lisa Talucci of Eating Recovery Center for their mannequin “I Am A Soul With A Body.” Their award was accepted by ERC Medical Director Emmitt R Bishop Jr, MD. Honorable Mention and iaedp Professionals Choice was awarded to Sara Burchfiel for her mannequin entitled, “Hear Me Please.” Her award was accepted, on her behalf, by therapist Rachel Levi of Shoreline Center.  

Imagine Me Beyond What You See” is an annual Body Image Mannequin Art Competition and Awareness Campaign designed to promote a healthy awareness and acceptance of body images. While mixed mediums are allowed, photographs of all entries had to be submitted to qualify for the contest and werel judged on clarity of theme, creativity and originality, quality of composition and design, along with the overall impression and presentation of the piece. This year’s judges include a distinguished panel of eating disorder professionals, art therapists, and renowned artist, Fritz Liedtke, who premiered his exhibit and photographic documentary “Skeleton in the Closet.

 

About iaedp:

Since 1985, the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation has provided education and training standards to an international and multidisciplinary group of various healthcare treatment providers and helping professions.

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Inside iaedp: Is the Ballerina Eating Too Many Sugarplums? Dec 10 2010

 
Will “Black Swan” Encourage Eating Disorders?
The Frisky.com – 8 Dec 10

Black Swan” is a great movie. It’s also, as Julie put it, “eating disorder porn.” In the movie, Natalie Portman’s character not only shows signs of anorexia-she’s also bulimic. I had hoped this wouldn’t seem glamorous to teens and women seeing the movie since, well, Natalie’s character also totally loses it in a downward spiral. But apparently that’s not the case.   

American Academy of Pediatrics Revised Policy Statement on the Treatment of Eating Disorders
Revised Policy – December 2010

Pediatricians are called on to become involved in the identificationand management of eating disorders in several settings and atseveral critical points in the illness. In the primary carepediatrician’s practice, early detection, initial evaluation,and ongoing management can play a significant role in preventingthe illness from progressing to a more severe or chronic state.In the subspecialty setting, management of medical complications,provision of nutritional rehabilitation, and coordination withthe psychosocial and psychiatric aspects of care are often handledby pediatricians, especially those who have experience or expertisein the care of adolescents with eating disorders. In hospitaland day program settings, pediatricians are involved in programdevelopment, determining appropriate admission and dischargecriteria, and provision and coordination of care. Lastly, primarycare pediatricians need to be involved at local, state, andnational levels in preventive efforts and in providing advocacyfor patients and families.

Judging The Bodies In Ballet
The dancer cast as the Sugar Plum Fairy, “looked as if she’d eaten one sugarplum too many,” and that her Cavalier, “seems to have been sampling half the Sweet realm.”   
NYT 4 Dec 2010 – Some correspondents have argued that the body in ballet is ‘irrelevant.’ Sorry, but the opposite is true. If you want to make your appearance irrelevant to criticism, do not choose ballet as a career. The body in ballet becomes a subject of the keenest observation and the most intense discussion. I am severe – but ballet, as dancers know, is more so.”  The dancers he was critiquing are pictured in the picture on the left.  Then he defends his words in another article. 

The Huffington Post Responds
09 Dec 2010
Regarding the issue that is drawing most attention in Mr. Macaulay’s original article on NYC Ballet’s production of the Nutcracker and in his subsequent piece, “Judging the Bodies of Ballet” — his comments on the dancers’ physical appearance — I am compelled to ask that we put this into perspective. When we speak of ‘plump’, ‘fat’, or ‘chubby’ ballet dancers, particularly those working for professional companies, we are referring to men and women who are most certainly below the medically recommended weight for their height. They are just not thin enough to meet the critics ideals. These individuals, under any other circumstance, are considered ‘skinny’ to ‘dangerously thin’. 

These articles appeared in this week’s issue of Inside iaedp.  If you would like to get the full details, please join our mailing list at www.iaedp.com (The sign up box is in the lower left column of the page). 

Editorial Note:  iaedp does not endorse the content of any news story; we only report it.  It is not our goal to approve or condemn any news printed in our newsletter; our purpose is to inform our expert membership with the hope that they will comment on the various written articles (when available on the site of origination). We believe that current events and news/publicity regarding eating disorders are pertinent in many ways to influence patient care, create awareness, understand how media information (or mis-information) may influence our clients and their families, and be knowledgeable about new research. 

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Inside iaedp: Eating Disorders in the News July 19, 2010

Fatness leads to inactivity, but inactivity does not lead to fatness: a longitudinal study in children  –Archives of Disease in Childhood –

Objective To establish in children whether inactivity is the cause of fatness or fatness the cause of inactivity.
Design A non-intervention prospective cohort study examining children annually from 7 to 10 years. Baseline versus change to follow-up associations were used to examine the direction of causality.
Setting Plymouth, England.
Participants 202 children (53% boys, 25% overweight/obese) recruited from 40 Plymouth primary schools as part of the EarlyBird study.
Main outcome measures Physical activity (PA) was measured using Actigraph accelerometers. The children wore the accelerometers for 7 consecutive days at each annual time point. Two components of PA were analysed: the total volume of PA and the time spent at moderate and vigorous intensities. Body fat per cent (BF%) was measured annually by dual energy x ray absorptiometry.

picky eatingNo Age Limit on Picky EatingThe Wall Street Journal July 5, 2010 – This is what Heather Hill eats: French fries, pasta with butter or marinara sauce, vegetarian pizza, cooked broccoli, corn on the cob and cakes and cookies without nuts.

Ms. Hill is what you might call a picky eater. But she isn’t a child. She’s a 39-year-old mother of three who runs her own business in Raleigh, N.C. She says she is unable to eat other foods. “When I was younger it was cute,” Ms. Hill says. “Now it’s embarrassing.”
People like Ms. Hill have long puzzled clinicians and medical experts because their behaviors don’t fit the definition of a traditional eating disorder, in which people aim to achieve a certain body weight. But picky eaters’ diets can be so limited that their food preferences interfere with their social and professional relationships, which is one of the hallmarks of a true disorder.  Read More
 
hungryiFilmmaker starves himself for three months
Jeremy Warren, Postmedia News · Saturday, Jul. 17, 2010

D’Arcy Mann starved himself for 100 days–by choice.
He ate, of course, during the 100 days, but limited his food to 200 to 400 calories per day — half an apple in the morning, a can of tuna for lunch and the other apple-half before bed.
For more than three months, the 37-year-old filmmaker wasted away and ultimately lost 63 pounds — the size of an average nine-year-old boy — from a starting weight of 240.
He lost hair, shaving cuts would take three weeks to heal, and he endured lethargy and bouts of dizziness and fainting.
“I seem to have aged two years in 100 days — the wrinkles are deep,” Mr. Mann said this week after finishing the extreme diet. “This is something that will mark me, physically, for life.”
Read More

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Inside iaedp: Eating Disorders in the News July 12, 2010

Eating Disorder Treatment Study: Research Study on Adolescent Eating Disorders, Helping Parents Help Their Children July 2010 – Duke University is conducting a clinical study comparing two therapy strategies that give parents tools to manage their child’s illness. Children will receive medical and nutritional management in addition to weekly therapy sessions.  Read More
 
sad childrenChildren’s hospital screening for PTSD: Badly injured kids who have disorder are being offered treatment, free of charge – By Mary Ann Roser AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF
Published: 10:34 p.m. Tuesday, July 6, 2010 –
Dell Children’s Medical Center in Austin is now screening the most severely injured children those who come through the hospital’s trauma center for post-traumatic stress disorder.
Children between the ages of 7 and 17 who show signs of mental or emotional stress are being offered free counseling, the researchers said. The screening and the counseling, both of which require parent and child permission, are part of a study aimed at predicting which children are likely to suffer PTSD, an ailment more often associated with troops traumatized in battle.
Read More
 
 
Editorial Note:  iaedp does not endorse the content of any news story; we only report it.  It is not our goal to approve or condemn any news printed in our newsletter; our purpose is to inform our expert membership with the hope that they will comment on the various written articles (when available on the site of origination). We believe that current events and news/publicity regarding eating disorders are pertinent in many ways to influence patient care, create awareness, understand how media information (or mis-information) may influence our clients and their families, and be knowledgeable about new research.
If you are interested in presenting at Symposium 2011, please review the Call for Proposals here! 
 
Membership renewals or new membership applications are now online.  Don’t let your membership expire.  Click here to renew or join!
 
Interested in becoming certified and joining an elite group of experience clinicians who have demonstrated their competency in eating disorders treatment?  We have a criteria grid which will help you understand what certification is right for you!  Certification Qualification Grid
 
iaedp™ offers the Equivalency Certification for both CEDS and CEDRD for those professionals who are able to demonstrate eating disorder proficiency and expertise through a range of equivalency requirements.  Do I qualify for Equivalency Certification? 

 

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Inside iaedp: Eating Disorders in the News June 18, 2010

skip lunchResearch, carried out by Cardiff University, involved 550 youngsters from South Wales aged from 11 to 16 years old, reveals that magazine images are linked to teenage eating disorders – WalesOnline.co.uk – June 19 2010
GOSSIP magazines have been linked to worrying changes in teenagers’ eating patterns that could lead to eating disorders.
Welsh research reveals a link between reading the weekly magazines, which regularly comment on celebrities’ body shapes, and boys and girls who skip meals, make themselves sick after eating or binge eat.  Read More   
 
kelly klump phdEstradiol implicated as potential genetic factor in eating disorders – EndocrineToday.com – June 18, 2010  – Preliminary data suggest that high levels of estradiol may play a role in eating disorders and body dissatisfaction among pubertal girls. Results of a pilot study conducted at Michigan State University and Florida State University indicate that the influence of one’s genes on eating disorder symptoms was much greater in pubertal girls with higher levels of estradiol (>5.79 pg/mL) than pubertal girls with lower levels of estradiol.
“In addition to the influence of ovarian hormones on mood, such as depression and anxiety, there are also very potent influences on eating disorders,” Kelly Klump, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Michigan State University, told Endocrine Today.
Read More   
 

brainscan2 Study: Human Brain Naturally Distorts Body Image – AOLHealth.com – June 16, 2010 – Scientists from University College London discovered that the brain naturally distorts body image, which could explain certain eating disorders, BBC News reports.
In the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Matthew Longo and his colleagues asked 18 volunteers to put their left hands palm down under a board and predict the location of their hand’s knuckles and fingertips using a pointer.  Read More

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Eating Disorders in the News/iaedp E-Newsletters

When we started the current format for our e-Newsletters, the goal was to create an awareness and an activisim opportunity for iaedp members.  We are not endorsing the content but only reporting it to our membership.  We believe that current events and publicity regarding eating disorders are pertinent in many ways to influence patient care, create awareness, understand how media information (or mis-information) may influence our clients and their families, and–in general–knowing what is happening outside our offices.  It’s in the news anyway.  Why not use it as an opportunity to establish yourself as an expert in the field?  It is not our purpose to approve or condemn; our purpose is to inform our expert membership with the hope that they will comment on the various written articles (where available) or on this blog site. 

We are offering this blog as a way to voice your thoughts and opinions regarding Eating Disorders in the News.  So you have a couple of choices:  1) leave a comment on the site of the article or 2) write your opinions here!

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