Monthly Archives: August 2010

Inside iaedp: Eating Disorders in the News August 25, 2010

   
woman working out
Hard Workouts Decrease Fertility (revealed by research study at Norwegian University of Science and Technology) – ntnu.com – New research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) shows that the body may not have enough energy to support both hard workouts and getting pregnant.  Read More
 
 
 
 
 
 
military wives
  
  
  
Budding Boudoir Photographer Shoots Military Wives/Moms’ Real Beauty
Photographer says “No” to Photoshop body nips/tucks and the women love the images they see!

Mom Logic.com posted Wednesday, August 18, 2010
A budding boudoir photographer shoots military moms’ real beauty — saying no to nips, tucks and Photoshop — and the women love the images they see!  Tatum Clark, 23, of Tatum Kathleen Photography, has a special passion for taking boudoir portraits of military wives and moms. “I do all different kinds of photography, but the one I hold closest to my heart is my boudoir photos,” she says. “I love making women feel beautiful.” 
Whenever possible, Tatum shoots intimate portraits that capture each woman’s unique beauty. “The bodies are raw and real, just like these women,” she says. “I think the female form is the most beautiful subject. I always want to draw it, paint it or photograph it. My goal is to showcase the bodies just the way they are in the best way possible.”
Tatum’s first boudoir-photography model was … herself. She shares her life with an amazing man in the military (he’s a Navy Seal), and she wanted to give him something special. “First,” she says, “it was self-portraits I was taking to send overseas to him. Then I began to shoot boudoir portraits of lots of other women in the military community who wanted to give the same gift to their loved ones serving our country.” (Tatum herself comes from a military family.)   Read More   (Thanks to Maggie Baumann, MA, MFT-I, an iaedp Chapter Board Member from Newport Beach, CA for submitting this story!)
 
 
 
 
 
 

   

 
teenager and stress
Stress Triggers College Eating Disorders – By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor, Psychcentral.com – Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on August 25, 2010
 

Beginning college is a landmark event for many young people and a key step toward adulthood. However, for some, it also can be an episode that pushes some into a dangerous battle with eating disorders.
Stress can trigger an eating disorder, and for the college student who is away from home for the first time, the stress of moving into a totally different environment and meeting new people can make them more susceptible to developing an eating disorder, says Mary Boggiano, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham. 
  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
America’s Next Top Model Whitney Thompson Exposes Naked Truth About Body Image
CBSnews.com – August 24, 2010 
The battle of body image just got a little easier on the eyes.
“America’s Next Top Model” season 10 winner Whitney Thompson has left her clothes at the door to headline this year’s “Love Your Body Day.”
The event, created by Thompson’s poster mate, Chenese Lewis, hopes to help women accept themselves and feel good about their bodies, regardless of the size.
whiteneythompson

The National Organization for Women (NOW) “launched the Love Your Body campaign in Sept. 1998 as a national day of action to speak out against advertisements and images of women that are harmful, offensive, disrespectful and demeaning,” the official site says. “Activists around the country say “no” to twisted beauty standard.”
Thompson, a 22-year-old beauty from Florida, has had plenty to say on the subject since becoming the first plus-sized model to win the television contest.
    Read Full Story  

Past Issues of iaedp E Newsletters are available on our archive page. 

 

 
Editorial Note:  iaedp does not endorse the content of any news story; we only report it.  It is not our goal to approve or condemn any news printed in our newsletter; our purpose is to inform our expert membership with the hope that they will comment on the various written articles (when available on the site of origination). We believe that current events and news/publicity regarding eating disorders are pertinent in many ways to influence patient care, create awareness, understand how media information (or mis-information) may influence our clients and their families, and be knowledgeable about new research.
 
 

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Inside iaedp: Eating Disorders in the News August 18, 2010

Anorexia bullying settlement: first of its kind

August 11th, 2010 3:52 pm – Philadelphia Examiner
A federal judge has approved a settlement of $55,000 in a first-of-its-kind lawsuit by a woman who claims her daughter was bullied into anorexia. Mary V. filed the lawsuit against the Pittsburgh, Pa. Schools last August on behalf of her daughter, who is now 15. Her daughter cites daily harassment by boys during the 2006-07 and 2007-08 school years, when the girl was in sixth and seventh grade. The harassment involved unrelenting taunting about the girl’s weight, including comments about her being “fat.” She subsequently developed anorexia, and entered an inpatient treatment program for because her weight was “dangerously low.”  Read More
 
Responsiveness of the Eating Disorders Quality of Life Scale (EDQLS) in a longitudinal multi-site sample – 7thspace.com – August 11, 2010 – Background In eating disorders (EDs) treatment, outcome measurement has traditionally focused on symptom reduction rather than functioning or quality of life (QoL). The Eating Disorders Quality of Life Scale (EDQLS) was recently developed to allow for measurement of broader outcomes.  edqls teamRead the study results

 

The Team that Originated the Work
From left to right: Gisele Marcoux, Janet Chafe, Carol Ewashen, Marlene Reimer, Carol Adair and Brian Cram.
Many of those from the original team are now collaborating on the next phase of research, Pediatric Validation of the Eating Disorders Quality of Life Scale. This team includes:

Carol Adair, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary; Gisele Marcoux, Eating Disorder Program, Calgary Health Region; Brian Cram, Eating Disorder Program, Calgary Health Region  Carol Ewashen, Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary; Janet de Groot, Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary Jorge Pinzon, Eating Disorder Program, Calgary Health Region; Patricia Fergusson, Child & Adolescent Eating Disorders Service, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority.
A multi-disciplinary team of clinicians and researchers across Canada collaborated on the development and validation of the Eating Disorders Quality of Life Scale. Visit the EDQLS Website to learn more 
 
anna nicoleAnna Nicole Smith suffered from Borderline Personality Disorder
Psychiatrist who saw Anna Nicole Smith testifies her pain medication was ‘overkill’
The Associated Press  By LINDA DEUTSCH AP Special Correspondent
LOS ANGELES August 13, 2010 (AP)
A hospital psychiatrist testified Friday that medication given to Anna Nicole Smith by a doctor now on trial was “overkill” for the kind of pain she was describing.

A doctor for Smith says the late Playboy model had chronic pain syndrome that was a challenge to treat because she was addicted to prescription drugs. Dr. Victor Kovner testified for a second day on Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010 in the Los Angeles trial of two other doctors and Smith’s boyfriend. Dr. Nathalie Maullin said she believed Smith had “a borderline personality disorder” and was addicted to prescription medications.
Maullin said she was on staff at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in April 2006 when Smith was brought in pregnant and in withdrawal from anti-anxiety drug Xanax and the pain killer Methadone. The celebrity model told her she had gone “cold turkey,” discontinuing her medications all at once because she was concerned for the welfare of her expected baby.
By doing that, Maullin said, she had actually endangered the baby and herself. The doctor said she quickly resumed her medication with Methadone and began weaning her off Xanax, both of which had been prescribed by Dr. Sandeep Kapoor, a defendant in the drug conspiracy case.  Read More 
Past Issues of iaedp E Newsletters are available on our archive page. 
 
Editorial Note:  iaedp does not endorse the content of any news story; we only report it.  It is not our goal to approve or condemn any news printed in our newsletter; our purpose is to inform our expert membership with the hope that they will comment on the various written articles (when available on the site of origination). We believe that current events and news/publicity regarding eating disorders are pertinent in many ways to influence patient care, create awareness, understand how media information (or mis-information) may influence our clients and their families, and be knowledgeable about new research.
Registration Opens in September!  
There is nothing more important in troubled economic times than bringing people together to reaffirm the path forward!  Join us in March!

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 iaedp™ Symposium 2011

The Pointe Hilton at Squaw Peak
Phoenix, Arizona
March 3-6, 2011

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Inside iaedp: Eating Disorders in the News August 11, 2010

Christina HendricksChristina Hendricks: I felt ‘invisible’ before Mad Men
Christina Hendricks, the curvaceous star of Mad Men, has told how she felt ostracised in Hollywood before winning her part in the hit US drama.
Telegraph.co.uk By Heidi Blake  Published: 10:00PM BST 01 Aug 2010
Hendricks said she was made to feel “invisible” when she first moved to Los Angeles where the show is filmed. The 35-year-old, who swept to instant fame in her role as the flame-haired secretary in the drama, which is shown on BBC Four, also disclosed that she does not feel she fully belongs in showbusiness. The size 14 actress, who plays the sassy secretary Joan Harris, was last month praised as a physical role model by the equalities minister Lynne Featherstone.She refused to lose weight despite being repeatedly told that she was too big to win starring roles. Hendricks, who was voted the “Sexiest Woman Alive” by female readers of Esquire magazine in May, added that she does not receive much male attention in Los Angeles.  Read More
 
January JonesWhy Mad Men’s women eat well and don’t work out, by January Jones, star of the award-winning TV drama By Chris Hastings- Telegraph.co.uk – Last updated at 11:06 AM on 2nd August 2010

It was a Size 14 bombshell, lobbed into the anorexic world of fashion.  And Equalities Minister Lynne Featherstone certainly caused an explosion when she declared last week that the curvaceous female stars of hit TV show Mad Men make ideal role models for young girls.The Minister earned criticism for arguing that the buxom, hourglass figures of actresses such as Christina Hendricks were both healthy and empowering.  And January Jones, who plays long-suffering housewife Betty Draper in the Emmy award-winning TV drama, says its creator Matthew Weiner agrees – telling female members of the cast to avoid strenuous exercise in order to maintain their curves and avoid muscle definition.  
Read More  (Be sure and read the comments at the bottom of this article!)
 
belly fatWaist size, not just weight, increases mortality rate

August 10, 9:55 PMMinnesota Heart Health ExaminerDeanna Sletten 

A study reported in the August 9, 2010 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine found that people with a large waist circumference are at a greater risk of dying than people who have a smaller waist. Surprisingly, a person’s weight was not as big a factor as a person’s waist size.The study was conducted by Eric J Jacobs, Ph.D. and colleagues from the American Cancer Society in Atlanta using questionnaires from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 1997. The study involved 56,343 women and 48,500 men age 50 and older. The researchers tracked deaths of the participants for 9 years from 1997 to 2006. Over this period of time 5,332 women and 9,315 men died of various causes.  Read More 
 
Dr Samuel KleinSamuel Klein MD an Obesity Expert Responds to Waist Size and Mortality Study

Aug 10, 7:23 AM EDT  By CARLA K. JOHNSON AP Medical Writer

Fat stored behind the abdominal wall may be more harmful than fat stored on the hips and thighs. Some scientists believe belly fat secretes proteins and hormones that contribute to inflammation, interfere with how the body processes insulin and raise cholesterol levels.
But Dr. Samuel Klein, an obesity expert at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is skeptical about that theory. Removing belly fat surgically doesn’t lead to health improvements. That may mean it’s simply a stand-in for some other culprit that is causing both belly fat and poor health. Klein wasn’t involved in the new research.
Klein said the new study, while showing a link between waist size and mortality, doesn’t pinpoint exactly how much belly fat is dangerous for normal, overweight and obese people. The 40-inch for men and 35-inch for women cutoff points are irrelevant for many people, he said.
What can be done to fight belly fat? It’s the same advice as for losing weight. Eat fewer calories and burn more through walking, bicycling and other aerobic exercise. “Sit-ups are useless,” Klein said.  Read Entire Article 

Past Issues of iaedp E Newsletters are available on our archive page. 
 
Editorial Note:  iaedp does not endorse the content of any news story; we only report it.  It is not our goal to approve or condemn any news printed in our newsletter; our purpose is to inform our expert membership with the hope that they will comment on the various written articles (when available on the site of origination). We believe that current events and news/publicity regarding eating disorders are pertinent in many ways to influence patient care, create awareness, understand how media information (or mis-information) may influence our clients and their families, and be knowledgeable about new research.

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Inside iaedp: Eating Disorders in the News August 3, 2010

Bulimia and the Vaso-Vagal Reflex

Many bulimics do well with cognitive behavioral therapy and group therapy. For drugs, the big one approved for treatment of bulimia right now is fluoxetine, or Prozac. No one really knows why, but serotonin reuptake inhibitors appear to work in about 50% of bulimics, regardless of whether or not they are depressed. But what about the other 50%? What about the people who don’t respond to these drugs? Well, scientists are still out to find an answer.
And this paper has a rather new hypothesis: the vagus nerve is to blame.  Read More
vagus nerve
obesity fundingTobacco Funds Shrink as Obesity Fight Intensifies
The New York Times
By DUFF WILSON
Published: July 27, 2010 – When the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation decided in 1991 to take on Joe Camel, it became the nation’s largest private funding source for fighting smoking. The foundation spent $700 million to help knock the cartoon character out of advertisements, finance research and advocacy for higher cigarette taxes and smoke-free air laws and, ultimately, to aid in reducing the nation’s smoking rate almost by half. But a few years ago, the Johnson foundation, based in Princeton, N.J., added another target to its mission, pledging to spend $500 million in five years to battle childhood obesity. As the antiobesity financing rose to $58 million last year, a new compilation from the foundation shows, the organization’s antismoking grants fell to $4 million.  Read More
Neurotopia – June 2, 2010 

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